Engine Rebuild

Engine rebuild.

So what started out as a simple valve job quickly escalated into an engine rebuild.

Since initial purchase of car I knew that a valve job was on order for the near future. Usual symptoms, smoke on overrun but not enough to cause any real concern.

Figured while we were in there I should add a hotter cam IE 292, etc.. and maybe splurge on Weber DCOE’s.

Fast forward to late September. My searching has yielded both a rebuilt E21 Head with Norris 300° cam ready to bolt on and a pair of lightly used Weber 40’s!

Just to confirm that block could handle upgrades I called Matt at SCR to schedule a leakdown test on the cylinders.

Insert photo results here.(#’s ran from 20%-80%)

 

 

Ouch!!! My heart stopped beating for at least a minute. I did everything to not puke on the shop floor and was a complete loss of words while Matt was consoling me with the cancer speech, not today or tomorrow but sometime in the future..

 

Matt was confident that engine would continue to run just as it had been for 40+ years if I didn’t redline it and go crazy. It would really come down to my decision for when I was ready to take it off the road. It would have probably been more cost effective to find a suitable replacement but with #’s matching and not wanting to risk same issue or worse with another block I decided to go down rebuild path.

I loaded the trunk with every tool and fluid imaginable, crossed my fingers and drove 230 miles through torrential downpours to my folks house in NH for the BavAuto Show and Shine. My wife was following me in her 2013 X3 and could hardly keep up with my pace. Guess I was determined to coast into town in neutral if engine gave out!

After some scheduling conflicts were worked out Scott Sislane and Matt Pickering showed up early one Sunday morning to help with engine pull.

 

IMG_2908

IMG_2909 New E21 Head

 

 

IMG_2913 IMG_2914

 

 

IMG_2225 IMG_2237 IMG_2241 IMG_2248 IMG_2246 IMG_2250 IMG_2251 IMG_2245 IMG_2253

IMG_2254 IMG_2255 IMG_2256 IMG_2262 IMG_2263 IMG_2266

IMG_9172 IMG_2918IMG_2264 IMG_2268 IMG_2269 IMG_2270 IMG_2272

 

IMG_9185 IMG_9184 IMG_9134 IMG_9180

Off to the machine shop!

BAKE/BLAST/ CYLINDER BLOCK
MAGNAFLUX CYLINDER BLOCK
JET WASH/FINAL CLEAN CYLINDER BLOCK INSTALL BRASS BLOCK PLUG
RESIZE CYLINDERS
SQUARE & DECK W/TIMING COVER CYLINDER BLOCK
PAINT BLOCK
MAGNAFLUX CRANKSHAFT
CHECK/ RADIUS/MICROPOLISH CRANKSHAFT JETWASH/FINAL CLEAN CRANKSHAFT MAGNAFLUX RODS
CHECK CON ROD BE/ALIGN
R&R PIN BUSHING/FIT/ALIGN
JETWASH/FINAL CLEAN CONNECTING ROD SET FILE FIT PISTON RINGS
BALANCE ASSEMBLY
REFACE FLYWHEEL
R & R DOWEL PINS
R & R ROCKER ARMS
DEGREASE CYLINDER HEAD
PRESSURE TEST CYLINDER HEAD
VACUUM TEST CYLINDER HEAD
RESURFACE CYLINDER HEAD

 

Parts List:

BavAuto Order/Parts #’s

11 12 0 621 144 Head Bolt – Sold Individually

10

11 31 1 744 KIT Timing Chain Tensioner Kit

1

11 31 0 731 105 Timing Chain – Dual Row

1

11 41 1 716 989 Oil Pump Chain

1

11 41 1 250 427 Oil Pump Shim – .1mm

3

11 21 0 666 110 Main Bearings – Standard Size

1

11 24 1284550/4 Connecting Rod Bearings – standard

1

11 24 0 618 110 Connecting Rod Nut and Bolt

8

33 32 1 140 568 *BOLT Main Caps

2

11 11 1 735 525 *BOLT Main Caps

8

11 51 1 256 600 Water Pump and Gasket – Aftermarket

1

11 11 1 734 114 Bottom End Gasket Set

1

11 12 9 065722K Head Gasket Set – E12 And E21 Cylinder Head

1

Pistons from Top End Performance:

BMW M10 with E21 Casting JE 2618

Alloy forged pistons with wrist pins and JE Rings 9.8:1 CR

 

 

Updated photo’s from machine shop will follow shortly along with step by step engine assembly.

CV joint renewal

First time wrenching and first time blogging so go easy on me :)

After Matt over at SCR pointed out that my cv boots were starting to show stress cracks I decided that this sounded like the perfect project for me to start with on my new 02. Little did I realize how involved this process was going to be.

First step was to remove the halfshafts. To do so use a 6mm allen bit on either a impact drill or ratchet(I found it easier to use a ratchet). The bolts connecting the halfshafts to the diff output flange had a nut on the backside whereas the bolts on the wheel side of the cv joint don’t.

 

Once halfshaft is removed take a screwdriver and release the old clamps on the boots. The original clamps simply need to have the end pried up and then give a good tug on the clamp. Once the clamps are out of the way I recommend putting on a pair of blue nitrile gloves( Have a box of these handy along with lots of shop towels) before you cut the boot off the cv joint. Exacto knife works great on this.

Above is what the joint looks like after removing boot. Wipe away excess grease and flip over to end cap. It is similar to a small paint can lid except you will find the lip easily bends so work your way around with a large flat head screwdriver and eventually it will pop off. You can always hammer the lip back to original contour when finished(Apparently the BMW cv boot kit includes new lids however I hear they cost $50 each vs $13).

Photo via http://www.my2002tii.com/july2003-2.htm

 

I reminded you to wear gloves! This moly grease is horrible stuff especially when it is 40 yr’s old.

Photo via http://www.my2002tii.com/july2003-2.htm

In above photo you see a c clip that needs to be removed in order to extract halfshaft from inner hub/race of cv joint. I thought that I could get a screwdriver under this but wasn’t happening. Off to home depot and $20 bucks poorer.. What else is new!

Once retaining clip is removed its time to extract halfshaft. I was lucky and mine pulled apart. I have seen posts on the faq where putting head of cv joint in a vice so halfshaft is loosely hanging and using a punch may be required. I would assume a 3 prong gear puller would work just as well.

Success! CV joints removed from halfshaft.

Using brake cleaner I thoroughly cleaned it from both sides till the inner race and bearings were completely clean. Don’t forget to spray the lid, washer, retaining clip and shaft. I spoke with Marshall Lytle on the faq and he now soaks everything in kerosene and attacks the parts with an old toothbrush, Afterwards spray everything with brake cleaner for final cleaning and let dry.

The cupped washer is the last thing to come off the shaft and first to go back on during reassembly. It should point up towards the joint.

Some on the faq will completely remove the race and bearings. I hear it’s similar to a rubiks cube but since mine cleaned out and looked good I proceeded without removal.

 

Repack with grease on both sides of cv joint. Matt from SCR recommended that I cut just a corner off the bag of grease that is included with cv boots. Then you can squeeze it like you were frosting a cake.

With new boot in place on the shaft and washer facing up its time to press joint back on. You should see the notch where the retainer clip goes around and then you can quit pressing. Insert retainer c clip add some grease and put lid back on.

Now comes time for getting the large end of the new boot over the joint. I found that by woking on half on I was able to get my finger under boot and work it around to get whole boot over lip of joint. Not easy but I’m open for better suggestions. Once boot is on secure with clamp.

Repeat process for other end of cv joint and put back on car. I found it necessary to loosen larger boot clamp on both sides so I could get the bolts started during installation back to diff output flange. Don’t forget to retighten clamps when finished.

Now go drink a beer or 6 of them!

Jeff